We’re All Videofreex:  Changing Media and Social Change from Portapak to Smartphone is now available for free download on iTunesU.

We’re All Videofreex:  Changing Media and Social Change from Portapak to Smartphone is now available for free download on iTunesU.

Skip Blumberg, Mary Curtis Ratcliff, Parry Teasdale, David Cort, Carol Vontobel, Davidson Gigliotti, Ann Woodward and Bart Friedman
We’re All Videofreex: Changing Media & Social Change from Portapak to Smartphone Friday, April 5

Skip Blumberg, Mary Curtis Ratcliff, Parry Teasdale, David Cort, Carol Vontobel, Davidson Gigliotti, Ann Woodward and Bart Friedman

We’re All Videofreex: Changing Media & Social Change from Portapak to Smartphone Friday, April 5

TODAY, WE ARE ALL VIDEOFREEX
SVA Theatre

TODAY, WE ARE ALL VIDEOFREEX

SVA Theatre

The VideofreexTop row: Skip Blumberg, Chuck Kennedy, Davidson Gigliotti, Parry Teasdale, Mary Curtis Ratcliff, David CortBottom row: Bart Friedman, Carol Vontobel, Nancy Cain, Ann Woodward

The Videofreex
Top row: Skip Blumberg, Chuck Kennedy, Davidson Gigliotti, Parry Teasdale, Mary Curtis Ratcliff, David Cort
Bottom row: Bart Friedman, Carol Vontobel, Nancy Cain, Ann Woodward

Activists can no longer rely on mainstream media to carry their messages, so they become media makers themselves, organizing actions via online social networks, bringing their own cameras and posting videos online.
Mark Tribe. Mark Tribe: The Port Huron Project. Charta, 2010. (p. 10)

Panelist Profile: Mark Tribe

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Mark Tribe is an artist whose work explores the intersection of media technology and politics. His photographs, installations, videos, and performances are exhibited widely, including recent solo projects at Momenta Art in New York, the San Diego Museum of Art, G-MK in Zagreb, and Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions. Tribe is the author of two books, The Port Huron Project: Reenactments of New Left Protest Speeches (Charta, 2010) and New Media Art (Taschen, 2006), and numerous articles. He is an Assistant Professor of Modern Culture and Media Studies at Brown University and faculty member in the MFA Art Practice program at School of Visual Arts in New York City. In 1996, Tribe founded Rhizome, an organization that supports the creation, presentation, preservation, and critique of emerging artistic practices that engage technology. He lives in New York City.

One of his recent projects, Dystopia Files, is an archive of video clips depicting public interactions between police and protesters in North America since 1999. Here, Tribe walks through an installation of the project at G-MK.

"I think of protest," Tribe notes on his website, “and the policing of protest, as public performance, and I’m interested in the ways in which video mediates these performances and inflects their position in the public sphere.”

Aware of the centrality of media in modern life, of the way television shapes reality and consciousness, video pioneers tried to gain access to mass media… The time had come for an information revolution. Influenced by theorists like Marshall McLuhan and Buckminster Fuller, artist-activists began to plot their utopian program to change the structure of information in America.

Deirdre Boyle. “From Portapak to Camcorder: A Brief History of Guerrilla Television.” Journal of Film and Video 44, no. 1/2 (April 1, 1992): 67–79. (p. 69)

Participant Profile: Deirdre Boyle

Deirdre Boyle is a media historian, writer and programmer.  She is the editor of  eight books and author of  Subject to Change: Guerrilla Television Revisited (Oxford, 1997), a history of early documentary video. Her essays on independent video and film have appeared in scholarly and popular journals such as College Art Journal, The Village Voice and Wide Angle, among many others. Her honors include Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellowships, the New School’s Distinguished Teaching Award and an ACE award for programming the Best Documentary Series on cable TV. She has been a media curator for museums, festivals, galleries, universities, media arts centers, and libraries around the world.  She is Associate Professor in the School of Media Studies at The New School for Public Engagement in New York City and was Director of their Graduate Certificate in Documentary Studies.

Changing Media & Social Change from Portapak to Smartphone

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